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Old 05-21-2019, 09:57 AM   #1
Cozmik Cowboy
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Default I knew him when.....

It's been kind of dead on here lately, so - just to say something - I'll relate something I think is pretty cool;

I was a Scoutmaster for a number of years; this morning I found out that my first Eagle Scout just won his second straight Emmy for multi-camera editing on Sesame Street.
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Old 05-21-2019, 06:43 PM   #2
JanVigne
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Mixed feelings about scouting. I've known too many Eagle scouts who weren't nice people as they grew up. Type A personality and all that jazz.


Never the less, it's always good to see success come to someone you knew when. Particularly in a very competitive field. Good luck to him.



"Sesame Street" just keeps pushing the envelope. I see they now have a character who lives in foster care.

We sit our neighbor's four year old boy twice a week and he can be captivated by the PBS kids' programming. He'll watch for hours, sitting quietly until a show comes on that encourages his participation. Then he'll answer the onscreen questions and get really taken up by the interaction.

The parents are mixed race and he was adopted almost directly from the hospital. His birth mother is a druggie who doesn't get the idea of not having kids. She gets the adoptive parents to pay for her care and hospitalization. Sort of like a private little factory she runs. She's never sure who the father is until they test for DNA.

I don't expect the boy will have problems in this home and family but I have no idea what that might do to him in the future. He was taken out of pre-school for anger issues, though he's easy for us to handle. He's creative, sees visual patterns in day to day objects very easily and can entertain himself with toys that call on this skill. If I'm around when he's ten, I'm going to hand him a camera and see what he can produce.

He's just assertive in that he has to have his way. He is learning what the term "adult in the room" means however.

Of course, he's only with us for a few hours each week. My impression is he's not with other kids most of the time. When he gets around other children his age and slightly older, he feels he has to be "the best" at anything and everything. He gets upset when he's not, though he can be brought around within a few minutes by giving him options of other things to do.

I remember the night I heard Bill O'Reilly say PBS was "the propaganda arm of the Democratic party." That's stayed with the O'Reilly/Fox audience and everything "Sesame Street" does to be more inclusive simply rattles their cages. Article in the paper today said "Arthur" showed a cartoon in which two gay characters get married. Alabama refused to air the show.

Kids have it hard enough in this world and turning them against shows like "Sesame Street" and "Arthur" sure seems like it's not helping.

My $0.02 worth.
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Old 05-21-2019, 06:49 PM   #3
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https://www.yahoo.com/gma/much-too-m...opstories.html
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Old 05-21-2019, 09:48 PM   #4
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Well, as an Eagle myself & father of another one, I may not be objective, but:
While there are problems with Scouting (slowly getting better as they've allowed first female leaders, then gay Scouts, then gay leaders, and now girls - add the atheists & they'll be OK), if it weren't for Scouting, I most likely would have been dead and/or in prison long ago; came way too close to both as it was.
And, if done right (the adult leadership in each unit is key) it teaches kids not only to be self-sufficient, but that you can win without making someone else lose; it's sort of the the anti-sport.

And yeah, I'm really proud that he's found his way to that particular gig, especially as he's self-taught (when he was doing his undergrad, I used to razz him that, given the likelihood of his BFA in painting working out financially, I was glad he had the philosophy minor to fall back on.....)
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:01 AM   #5
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As an adult I had no contact with Scouts for either boys or girls. That meant getting my news about Scouting from the media. As is often the case, all of the good and decent stories created by an organization get lost in the few stories that make headlines on the evening news.

IMO it's unfortunate the Boy Scouts had to have their laundry aired on national media. It's equally unfortunate the leadership of the Scouts organization had to finally face challenges which threatened Scouting's sustainability before giving an inch to progress. That feet planted in cement stance though does seem today to be the first taken by any organization sorely in need of change.

Many times the leaders at ground level must simply put their heads down and plow through, hoping they are doing their best while leadership makes fools of themselves.

Corny or not, it does take a village to raise a child.

With the history of Scouting for both girls and boys behind them, I do hope the organizations have righted the ship and will carry on turning out success stories. It seems as though there is a never ending stream of young kids who need a community to exist in and to depend on without questions being asked.




Our four year old neighbor loves sugar as much as any four year old can love sugar. He becomes obsessive over his snacks so we limit his sugar intake on his time spent with us to avoid his sugar driven highs. We have in the past kept some small packets of fruit juice sweetened gummies in a bowl for his treats. He could see them and he knew they were available and that he would get a treat when he behaved.

Lately, however, we've taken the bowl off the table so he can't just reach for more and then be told "no". Over the last few months he's too often tried to play us with his "I'm just a cute kid" act by trying to do something against the rules while looking straight at us and then just reaching. That of course results in being told "no" and then he throws a snit when told to put them back. Snits don't have much traction at our house.

Last week during his visit, he simply got down from his chair and marched over to the pantry where the box of gummies are kept. Knowing what he was up to I held the door shut and told him, "No."

At first he tried the sweet eyes trick and I still said, "No."

Then he resorted to just pulling on the door as I continued to say, "No."

Eventually, he began his melt down. It takes just a few seconds of this before we can divert his attention to some other activity he likes and avoid screaming fits.

Later, after he had gone into the TV room with my partner I brought in a single bag of gummies. I asked if he would like to have it and got a vigorous headshake in the affirmative.

"What do you say?"

"May I have some, please?"

Our one small food driven dog, Maggie, had followed me into the room obviously hoping I would somewhere along the way decide she deserved a treat more than did the boy.

"What do you do if I give these to you?", I said while pointing to Maggie.

After a pause and a glance at Maggie he said, "Share with Maggie."

"And what else?", I said as I pointed toward my partner who was sitting on a chair alongside the boy.

"Give some to Auntie Al."

So he got his treat after all and he shared as he had said he would, being extra careful when handing the single gummie to Maggie making sure he still had five fingers coming back. What followed was a discussion about sharing and seeing others before you took care of yourself.

That was last week. This past Monday he was over and, while I was out of the room, he asked if he could some gummies. Aware she may have been asked because I was out of the room and knowing it's at times tough to outsmart a four year old, she said he could have one pack.

He went to the pantry and pulled out several bags. Ready for another melt down when he was told he could only have one pack, my partner was surprised when told her he had picked up extra so the treat bowl could be stocked again.

He sat back down with one package and asked if she would like to have a gummie. She said she would and thanked him which got a polite, "You're welcome."

Then he called to Maggie and, as she slid to a stop in front of him, he asked Maggie if she too would like a gummie. He gently handed her a single gummie as we have shown him to do with a dog who will take too much finger to just get a single bite of anything.

That only left about four gummies for him but he sat and ate them slowly while enjoying each bite. He and my partner had another discussion about sharing, feeling good that you did share what you had and seeing other people before you took care of yourself.

That was Monday, we'll see what today's visit brings.



Hollywood stories are sometimes true and sometimes one or two people can make a tremendous difference in who the child grows to be as an adult. With the hundreds of people a child comes in contact with as they grow up, there are always the few they remember who made a change for the better in their life. If you can see just a small bit of what you taught the child in the adult, you've done well IMO.

Congrats for putting in the effort and making a difference, Cowboy.
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Old 05-22-2019, 01:34 PM   #6
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https://www.gocomics.com/doonesbury/2019/05/22
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