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Old 02-11-2018, 01:19 PM   #1
JanVigne
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Default Watching the Olympics is making me cold

Not at all a guitar related thread but ...

I have never warmed up to the winter Olympics (pun intended) but I really can't sit and watch this stuff for the most part.

Should I somehow really care who wins or loses the luge event? Or, curling? How about freestyle snowboarding?

This all just strikes me as of much value as a medal in playing ping pong in a hurricane. Or miniature golf in a flood.
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Old 02-11-2018, 04:45 PM   #2
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They need sand volleyball
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Old 02-11-2018, 04:49 PM   #3
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Ho, I say - and hum as well.
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Old 02-11-2018, 05:19 PM   #4
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"They need sand volleyball"



TMI, mcquinnsr, TMI!
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Old 02-18-2018, 02:48 PM   #5
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I very much prefer the Winter Olympics over the Summer Olympics. I could do without the events that are decided by judges in either.
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Old 02-20-2018, 03:10 AM   #6
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Snowboarding is awesome. The gold medal runs by Red Gerard and Shaun White were ridiculously impressive. Winter sports aren't for everyone and that's fine by me, makes the lift lines shorter.

But seriously, if those clips don't impress you, I mean, c'mon!

Of course, these guys are the best of the best, at the peak of their careers-and I was only ever slightly above average on a snowboard-like when I started 20 years ago, but it really is a lot of fun. Snowing here in the PNW this week too.
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Old 02-20-2018, 07:29 AM   #7
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The great former Chicago Tribune sports columnist Bernie Linscombe once wrote (in response to what he called "the ice dolllies" of the Winter Games:

"If you can't measure it with a stopwatch, a tape measure, or a scoreboard, it's not a sport."

Yes, the snowboarders are amazing examples of what you can do when you have bad parents (no way I'd let my kid try that foolishness - not snowboarding, but the "extreme" stuff) trying to make it a competition is just silly.
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Old 02-20-2018, 10:37 AM   #8
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I'm in for making Demolition Derby an Olympic Sport.

Don't need no stopwatch.

Don't need no tape measure.

Don't need no fancy equipment.

Don't need any kind of "favorable" weather.

Don't need ten Olympic venues.

Don't need orthopedic surgeons standing by.

All you need is 1/4 a gallon o' gasoline and space.

You can do it in either the winter or the summer games - or both!

It shows the true art of any and all sports, being the last one left still moving.



And, if it will make mcquinnsr happy, we can put the competitors in bikinis.
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Old 02-20-2018, 10:47 AM   #9
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Speaking of well known and subversively funny writers for the Chicago tribune, here's the writer I best remember from the heyday of mid-20th century newspaper journalism; https://www.brainyquote.com/authors/mike_royko
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Old 02-20-2018, 11:54 AM   #10
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In hopes of tying all of this back to the plot line of our little drama, here's one of the better quotes about Mike Royko made by Roger Ebert, who also wrote for a well read Chicago newspaper, The Chicago Sun Times ...


"Here's how much I know about hockey. Mike Royko and I were in a tiny bar one winter night, and the radio kept reporting goals by the Blackhawks. I mentioned how frequently the team was scoring. 'You're listening to the highlights,' Royko observed."












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Old 02-20-2018, 10:10 PM   #11
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I grew up in a town of about 800 in SE Ohio; when I moved to Chicago (even having passed through Waukegan & Evanston on the way) it was a bit of a culture shock. I had friends who showed me where things were - but I learned how to be a Chicagoan by reading Mike Royko (who, I must note, spent many years at the Sun-Times; he left for the Tribune because he had too much integrity to work for Rupert Murdcoch).
There'll never be another like him.
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Old 02-21-2018, 09:49 AM   #12
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The St. Louis Post Dispatch - the paper of record I read on the Illinois side of The River - carried Royko's column. That's like the NRA magazine having a permanent column by Dianne Feinstein.


That's how good a writer Royko was. That's how perceptive he was to the human condition.

Like great protest songs, I'm hoping there will be others like the originals. But I'm not holding my breath.
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Old 02-27-2018, 05:15 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JanVigne View Post
I'm in for making Demolition Derby an Olympic Sport.

Don't need no stopwatch.

Don't need no tape measure.

Don't need no fancy equipment.

Don't need any kind of "favorable" weather.

Don't need ten Olympic venues.

Don't need orthopedic surgeons standing by.

All you need is 1/4 a gallon o' gasoline and space.

You can do it in either the winter or the summer games - or both!

It shows the true art of any and all sports, being the last one left still moving.



And, if it will make mcquinnsr happy, we can put the competitors in bikinis.
Works for me. All of it. But the competitors in bikinis gotta be women.
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Old 02-27-2018, 05:16 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JanVigne View Post
The St. Louis Post Dispatch - the paper of record I read on the Illinois side of The River - carried Royko's column. That's like the NRA magazine having a permanent column by Dianne Feinstein.


That's how good a writer Royko was. That's how perceptive he was to the human condition.

Like great protest songs, I'm hoping there will be others like the originals. But I'm not holding my breath.
Journalism is dead, but if there are any good writers left, they might be sportswriters.
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Old 02-27-2018, 10:03 AM   #15
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I'd have to say I still feel journalism is alive and doing well but there are too many fools out there trying to beat it to death with a club, stab it in the back and kick it over the cliff.

Royko and Studs Terkel were products of their time and that time is long gone. We can't return there and probably shouldn't try.

They never left their roots and they always sort of existed in the small bars and on the dirty streets of the cities and places they loved. There is an unstated pride in who their people were and in what they did. Their heroes and heroines were always the "little guy" and the "mother of five". No "poor schlubs", their subjects always had their personal dignity.

People would call out to them on the street and they would just give a nod. Both were adored by their readers and both always seemed slightly embarrassed by their fame. But they deeply understood the people and they wrote about the people and things they understood by beating it out on a keyboard to beat a deadline.

One thing about them, they lived and wrote during a time when photojournalism was a constant thing. Nowdays, too many newspapers and magazines have retired their photographers and told their print writers to use their smartphone to get the shot.

Writers can't capture the exact moment Oswald gets shot or the drama of Yogi Berra watching the ball ride the wind over the outfield wall or of Jackie Robinson sliding into home plate under the tag.

https://www.google.com/search?q=yogi...hrome&ie=UTF-8

Royko wrote with a clarity that his words would make it impossible for the editor to insert the wrong photo.

Lots of talk about how so many things have been made cheaper over the years, and much of it is true. Today writers like Royko and Terkel would have to concern themself with not only getting the story but also getting the shot. I think they might both forget the shot and just let their words paint the images. They were masters of the art of journalism.

The days of Royko and Terkel exist as a time when journalism was rich and quite fearless. They lived in a moment of history when they could feel their oats and there was no concern about the oats being GMO free.

I would hate to think young writers aren't reading what these guys put out and thinking, "I can do that."


http://www.nytimes.com/books/99/09/2...rkel-hard.html
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Old 02-27-2018, 10:25 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JanVigne View Post
I'd have to say I still feel journalism is alive and doing well but there are too many fools out there trying to beat it to death with a club, stab it in the back and kick it over the cliff.

Royko and Studs Terkel were products of their time and that time is long gone. We can't return there and probably shouldn't try.

They never left their roots and they always sort of existed in the small bars and on the dirty streets of the cities and places they loved. There is an unstated pride in who their people were and in what they did. Their heroes and heroines were always the "little guy" and the "mother of five". No "poor schlubs", their subjects always had their personal dignity.

People would call out to them on the street and they would just give a nod. Both were adored by their readers and both always seemed slightly embarrassed by their fame. But they deeply understood the people and they wrote about the people and things they understood by beating it out on a keyboard to beat a deadline.

One thing about them, they lived and wrote during a time when photojournalism was a constant thing. Nowdays, too many newspapers and magazines have retired their photographers and told their print writers to use their smartphone to get the shot.

Writers can't capture the exact moment Oswald gets shot or the drama of Yogi Berra watching the ball ride the wind over the outfield wall or of Jackie Robinson sliding into home plate under the tag.

https://www.google.com/search?q=yogi...hrome&ie=UTF-8

Royko wrote with a clarity that his words would make it impossible for the editor to insert the wrong photo.

Lots of talk about how so many things have been made cheaper over the years, and much of it is true. Today writers like Royko would have to concern themself with not only getting the story but also getting the shot. I think they might both forget the shot and just let their words paint the images. They were masters of the art of journalism.

The days of Royko and Terkel exist as a time when journalism was rich and quite fearless. I would hate to think young writers aren't reading what these guys put out and thinking, "I can do that."


http://www.nytimes.com/books/99/09/2...rkel-hard.html
I am convinced young journalism majors aren't reading these guys period, or a minority are. And few take journalism seriously as it waken seriously 3-4-5 generations ago. It's simply a cutthroat business these days, it's politics, it's advertising-pays-the-bills. Even early TV journalists wouldn't recognize what passes for TV journalism today. And I don't care what network one favors.
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Last edited by ReallyCrappyPlayer; 03-01-2018 at 08:00 AM.
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Old 02-27-2018, 01:20 PM   #17
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Time for a "Jan Story".


I was working out in the yard a few years back when I was approached by young man asking me to buy something or other because he was competing for money which he would use to attend his next year in college. Well, I didn't buy anything from him because I just didn't need what he was selling - sort of like when the kids come by with a bucket full of candy asking me to buy some so they can win their contest and I tell them there's a diabetic in the house. Then I look around and see these kids have just been driven into a neighborhood and dumped to go knock on doors. No training, no adult supervision or protection, just send them out to collect some money and tell them to meet up at 9PM.



The young man was however jovial and engaging and since I was in need of a break from the yard, I got us a few cold drinks and sat down on the porch for awhile to talk to him. It was a hot day and he was in need of a break too.

"So, what are you going to study in college?"

"I want to get a degree in mass communications with an emphasis in television."

"That's a pretty competitive field. What's your plan?"

"I figure I can get my degree and find a $80,000 or so a year job as a news anchor with a station and then go on from there."

"OK, that doesn't really sound like a plan to me. Do you have any idea how long the local newscaster on Channel 8 has been in that anchor chair?"

"No, why?"

"Well, I've lived in Dallas since the late '70's and he's been in that chair for most of that time. Those aren't jobs that just open up every year."

"Really? I didn't know that."

We talked and finished our drinks and then parted ways. I have no idea whatever happened to his dream of stepping into a $80k job right out of college.


Journalism has been diluted by everyone who has a smartphone and thinks they have a right to show everyone on Facebook and youtube what they think is "news worthy".

More over, it has become a game of celebrities. Profits too, but a lot of celebrities who have "followers".

I don't feel Royko ever sought celebrity, and he certainly never got rich doing it, it just came to him from putting out what he thought was doing the best job he could.
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