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Old 10-29-2017, 06:00 AM   #1
ReallyCrappyPlayer
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Default What kind of Picks? Or no Picks?

What kind of picks do you like? Or do you play your acoustics without picks?

I use National finger picks for--wait for it--finger picking. For years I used standard plastic thumb picks with them. I couldn't find thumb picks with a short enough tip so I would grind the tip short. I like my thumb to be able to move between the lower strings quickly and it was easier with a short tip. Some years ago I found some hybrid thumb picks that are very small standard picks affixed to the part of a standard thumb pick that surrounds the thumb. They are marked Bumble Bee. They are made by Fred Kelly. I don't need to keep my thumb as close to the strings as I once used to.

For many years I used to strum with the back of my finger tips, primarily forefinger. I couldn't use a pick well and often dropped them, where as often as not they would end up under furniture or drop into the sound hole. It's really only in my later years I learned to play with a pick without dropping it frequently. I'm not sure if it was finding the right pick for me, or lots of practice, or the combination. A couple decades ago I found some large triangular picks, #355 by Fender and bought both Medium and Thin versions. They are celluloid I fell in love with the thin size. They're not marked but an educated guess is that they are probably about .40 thick? Very thin.



I recently wanted some new ones but looking online could only find them by the half gross or gross, which I would never use up. So I tried some D'Andria 355 picks, celluloid, .46, and these are similar, nearly the same. I also tried some D'Andria 355 in Delrex, as this is a new (to me) material. These are .50. A bit thick for my tastes. At any rate, I am a huge fan of the triangular shape. For songs where there is a good bit of individual note picking as well as strumming, one can get his fingers pretty close to the tip of these picks--the closer the firmer the material due to finger support, and one can make a string ring like a bell or do anything else one wants to do.

I mentioned I had solved the dropping problem so time ago, but I ran across a product called Monster Grips recently, and had to try it. These are TINY rubber circles that you stick on one side of your pick to give it some grip. They are supposed to be removable and (?) re-usable. I tried one on a celluloid pick and it doesn't interfere with my playing at all. Is it better than a nekkid pick? Don't know. Have only used them for a few weeks. For less than $10 for a sheet of a dozen or so it would seem worth a try if you have the slightest tendency toward the dropsies. They can be used on the top, bottom, or both sides of your pick.
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Old 10-29-2017, 10:10 AM   #2
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I haven't really used picks for my Spanish style guitars since waaaaay back in the '60's when I began playing a nylon string guitar and playing with my fingers only. I did recently find a large triangular pick (similar to what you show) at a local Hispanic bazaar so I bought it to remind me of my electric days with my '67 Silvertone/Danelectro; https://reverb.com/item/4353968-1960...lectric-guitar I still have the guitar, plus a much newer Epiphone Sheraton, but I haven't picked up either electric in ages. I remember sticking with some small "jazz picks" when I most recently played either.

Despite not using picks very often, when I would attend either of the two shows held in the Dallas area each year, I would more often than not come home with not much more than a pocketful of picks. They're one of those things where I can become fascinated at the amount of thinking that goes into something as apparently simple as a guitar pick. How many ways can you cook a possum?

I've mentioned I had started to play a lap steel and a squareneck resonator after I shattered my elbow a few years back. A friend (who is a very good professional player) recommended I try the ivoroid Golden Gate thumbpicks so I picked up a few and they're good picks for playing lap style due to their extended length; https://www.elderly.com/accessories/...ck-ivoroid.htm

But I do have a collection of picks from the shows and I will occasionally vacillate toward the Dunlop nickel pick and the Propik Delrin. Most thumb and finger picks just don't hit my thumb or finger in the right spot to be really comfortable so I've taken to wrapping some mole skin (https://www.walgreens.com/store/c/wa...c-be0bc2e9e473) around the inside of my thumbpicks and my slides.

I stick with John Pearse fingerpicks for lap style playing, once again due to their length and comfort ; http://www.juststrings.com/jps-hr.ht...CABEgJCqfD_BwE

Most finger picks tend to hit my nail base in just the wrong spot so I've tried numerous picks for playing Spanish style. I seldom use a thumbpick for Spanish style but I will tend to stick with a Herco heavy when I use a pick; https://www.sweetwater.com/store/det...SAAEgJItfD_BwE

I've clipped it back to sit just proud of my thumb so my hand fits in close to the strings. On occasion I'll use a Propik that's similar to the Bumblebee; https://www.elderly.com/accessories/...-flat-pick.htm

Fingerpicks for Spanish style are generally Propiks; https://www.elderly.com/accessories/...large-pair.htm



I had to break up a dog fight last month and one of the pups sank her canine tooth right into the nail base of my right thumb. It's going to take a while to heal and during that time I can't really comfortably play fingerstyle so I've gone back to a flat pick for now. I have never developed a tight grip on any flatpick so, after lots of experimentation, I've stayed with either Cool Picks or V picks because they stay put without requiring a death grip from my fingers.

https://www.elderly.com/cool-picks-j...ick-102640.htm

https://www.elderly.com/v-pick-flatpick-111565.htm

I have a collection of sizes and shapes in both but stick with rather small "traditional" shapes and medium to heavy gauge.

I like to think up "solutions" to problems I find so I have taken small bits of 600 grit sandpaper and glued them to various cheap picks to experiment. I've also use the circular binderhole reinforcements from the office supply store and they work well as long as your hands don't sweat profusely and turn them to mush. Office supply stores also sell a slightly gummy substance to apply to the end of your fingers when sorting papers; https://www.staples.com/Lee-Sortkwik...oduct_SS913154

Any of those ideas worked but I finally just bought the actual picks.

Thing is, what works for me may not work for anyone else as a recommendation.
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Old 10-29-2017, 01:49 PM   #3
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I like thinner picks ,usually Jim Dunlop .60 ,tend to dig in with thicker ones .
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Old 10-30-2017, 06:32 AM   #4
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These days I almost always fingerpick bare-fingered, with all 10 nails trimmed down to the quick.
Part of the reason for this is that I can't seem to hold a pick still; they turn in my grip & I drop them. So lately I've begun experimenting with using a Zookies 30 angled thumbpick as a flatpick. It's taking some adjustment, but I think it will work.
For when I do use a regular flatpick, I have a handful of old, out-of-production Adamas graphite ones; about the thickness of a Fender medium, a little stiffer than a purple Tortex - plus raised logo & lettering to help with grippage.
But my 2 favorites were gifts: My oldest son gave me a glass pick, which surprised me by being extremely warm; my youngest gave me one that a local artisan where he lives in Alaska carved out of 50,000-year-old fossilized walrus ivory. Very thin, perfectly stiff, and curved to fit my thumb. That one isn't in the large prescription bottle with all the other picks, the spare slide, etc.; it lives in the mesh bag it came in, by itself on a bookshelf.
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Old 10-30-2017, 07:29 AM   #5
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Thanks for the replies, guys. Really interesting that something as seemingly innocuous as a pick can be so different for every player. Thanks for all those links, Jan. Useful stuff. The Golden Gate thumbpick is quite like the plastic thumbpicks I had long ago (still have one at least) except mine don't have the rippled surface. Oddly enough, those are the ones I cut down early on for a shorter tip. Different strokes, eh?

I gotta ask a general question about fingerpicks. I have always played with the fingerpicks covering my fingertips--not as an extension of my fingernail. I never grew out my fingernails and used them as picks, so it never occurred to me to use fingerpicks as fingernails extensions. Do pros play with fingerpicks this way? I realize I sound as if I've been clustered in a monastery, but I really don't know. As a teen and into my twenties my first teach and mentor fingerpicked with the tips covering his fingertips, not nails, also, and so I always thought this was the norm. While I've been a fan of Bluegrass all my life, I've watched much more rock and roll up close and personal, and thus never focused on fingerpickers. And if I haven't said this,
I am not trying to play like every musician I enjoy hearing, so you won't see me trying to duplicate licks and passages. This may sound like an excuse not to learn, but I play what I like and like what I play so that's how it is.

Re: holding on to picks. You guys are clever. I never thought about half the stuff mentioned in the replies. I do have, or had (?) a heavy plastic pick with a thumb indent that had a checkered pattern, meant to increase the hold, but the darn thing was too thick for my taste--I hated the sound. I found a similar one made of nylon (not Delrin, but flexible nylon) but the sound was still not what I wanted.

It sounds like you fellas prefer thicker picks than I do. I realize this depends on playing style, music, venue, and strings, but I really like the very light picks with any strings I've used. They sound more like what I can get with my bare fingers but more consistent and controllable. Of course I'm playing in my home with no need for lots of projection that one would need from --especially an unamplified--acoustic for a gig.
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Old 10-30-2017, 08:23 AM   #6
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Can say much about all pros but; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BqISqpMRo8

A good many "roots" pickers used only a thumbpick and a single fingerpick on their index finger. Doc Watson finger picked with that arrangement; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cE2swkx9WXE

Others just use flesh; http://www.gibson.com/News-Lifestyle...he-Finger.aspx
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Old 10-30-2017, 12:19 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JanVigne View Post
Can say much about all pros but; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BqISqpMRo8

A good many "roots" pickers used only a thumbpick and a single fingerpick on their index finger. Doc Watson finger picked with that arrangement; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cE2swkx9WXE

Others just use flesh; http://www.gibson.com/News-Lifestyle...he-Finger.aspx
No doubt James Taylor is great but I'm not wearing fake nails.

Doc Watson is awesome. I never realized he finger-picked with one finger instead of three. How he did those doubles and triples on Deep River Blues with finger is beyond my knowledge. They didn't show his left hand on that video.
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Old 12-12-2017, 05:26 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cozmik Cowboy View Post
These days I almost always fingerpick bare-fingered, with all 10 nails trimmed down to the quick....
This. And I make my own picks with one of those cool pick making thingies. I like my picks thin and flexible. I've found the plastic tub that "I Can't Believe It's Not Butter" came in to be perfect.
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Old 12-13-2017, 12:52 PM   #9
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Not to mention they're tasty too!
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Old 12-13-2017, 04:25 PM   #10
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Not to mention they're tasty too!
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Old 12-15-2017, 12:46 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cozmik Cowboy View Post
These days I almost always fingerpick bare-fingered, with all 10 nails trimmed down to the quick.
Part of the reason for this is that I can't seem to hold a pick still; they turn in my grip & I drop them...
Returning to this thread. When you used fingerpicks were they National fingerpicks? Steel? I use these and I set them up by squeezing them to fit each finger. I sometimes bend them a bit too. A small smooth faced pliers works well. Or a padded needle-nosed. If it seems too hard to match the pick to your fingers next time you pick them up just mark each one with a permanent marker on the back using a different color coded to your fingers.

Just a suggestion. I know playing in a room at home doesn't require the volume of fingerpicks but I play with them more for the sound I get; as you well know it's quite different from the sound fingertips (sans nails) can make.
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Old 12-15-2017, 07:41 AM   #12
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Looking back, I see I explained why I fingerpick, but not why I do so sans fingerpicks.
I have tried both plastic & metal fingerpicks; my problem isn't fit - it's that I have a tendency, left over from a period where my main tool was the Richie Havens Flail, to every now and then downstroke with the back of the finger, causing picks to catch on the string.
And I can't feel where the end of a fingerpick is; my fingers I usually can.
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Old 12-16-2017, 02:24 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Cozmik Cowboy View Post
Looking back, I see I explained why I fingerpick, but not why I do so sans fingerpicks.
I have tried both plastic & metal fingerpicks; my problem isn't fit - it's that I have a tendency, left over from a period where my main tool was the Richie Havens Flail, to every now and then downstroke with the back of the finger, causing picks to catch on the string.
And I can't feel where the end of a fingerpick is; my fingers I usually can.
As I am pretty sure I can learn something from every message you post, I have more questions. I am puzzled why you would downstroke with a fingerpick rather than the thumbpick--but I'm not advanced enough and don't watch enough players anymore to know if this is common.

When I strummed (I hate that term because it brings to mind a picture of someone who can't do anything with his right hand (or left, should he be in his right mind) except strum 1-2-3-4...anyway, when I strum without a flat pick I use the back of my fingers all the time, but it never translated to fingerpicking for me. It never occurred to me, for bad or good.

Of course I don't really use my hand that way anymore as I use a flat-pick for "strumming" 99% of the time. With fingerpicks, I don't strum at all. Possibly related to my Really Crappy Playing, I don't know.
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Old 12-16-2017, 11:21 AM   #14
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OK, let me see if I can make this intelligible, Mark; I'm down-stroking the low strings with my thumb, up-stroking the high strings with my fingers (well, mostly just my middle finger; it's not like I'm good at this or anything). Once in a while (and usually without forethought) I will throw in a frail - hitting the strings with the nails on a downstroke.
This is in addition to the usual thumb down-stroke, not in place of it. Frailing with fingerpicks on is a sure recipe for entanglement.
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Old 12-16-2017, 12:21 PM   #15
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"Frailing with fingerpicks on is a sure recipe for entanglement."



So said the non-banjo playing guitar picker.
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Old 12-16-2017, 02:57 PM   #16
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So I should amend that to read "subconscious frailing by a non-banjo playing guitar picker is a sure recipe for entanglement"?
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Old 12-16-2017, 04:26 PM   #17
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Much better.
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Old 12-17-2017, 05:57 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cozmik Cowboy View Post
OK, let me see if I can make this intelligible, Mark; I'm down-stroking the low strings with my thumb, up-stroking the high strings with my fingers (well, mostly just my middle finger; it's not like I'm good at this or anything). Once in a while (and usually without forethought) I will throw in a frail - hitting the strings with the nails on a downstroke.
This is in addition to the usual thumb down-stroke, not in place of it. Frailing with fingerpicks on is a sure recipe for entanglement.
Okay, I didn't really understand the term frail so I did some learning via this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l5gwA2RLfaI

Now I understand the issue. With fingerpicks, worn conventionally, this would indeed be an issue.
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Old 02-08-2018, 12:33 PM   #19
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Just checking in with an update here.

Due to the dog fight and the problem thumbnail I mentioned in my op, I had the right hand thumbnail removed last week. Don't know how many nails you've had removed in your days but, you do get some sense of why a lot of folks would think about telling all they knew about just where the bombs are located.


Playing "thumbstyle" without a nail is somewhat uncomfortable towards this is going to get really, really frickin' painful. So I was digging into my stash of picks last week for a suitable thumb pick. Therefore, most of last week was only dedicated to running through a series of Travis Picking exercises with various picks. For better or worse, Dallas has had some crappy weather lately so it wasn't like I should have been outside getting the garden ready for Spring tomatoes. I could easily rationalize away the time spent playing with my own fingers - and a thumb or two. I had at least a dozen thumb picks to try and I lost count of how many finger picks I've brought home from the shows. They're both like rescue dogs, they just seem to collect around my house.

One of the problems I've always had with thumbpicks - I have fingernails that break when I use them to open the packaging on a stick of gum (even those little bitty packs of Dentyne) - stems from my earliest days of learning how to play the acoustic guitar. I (more or less) taught myself on a classical, nylon string guitar which requires a very different angle of attack on the strings vs a steel string guitar playing acoustic blues. I tended to pick the bass side strings more with the tip of my thumb rather than the flat side of my thumb. That meant most thumb picks would sit too far back on my thumb to be anything more than a train wreck waiting to happen. Once the thumb went off the rails, the other fingers soon followed and the pile up wasn't pleasant to watch or hear. Sad to say, many, many fatalities have resulted from my attempts at learning to use finger picks.

Needing to find a thumb pick, or stop playing acoustic for several months while the new nail formed, was enough to make me change my hand position with some dedication to results. And while I would say I can now play well with virtually any length and gauge of pick from a National to a Herco, I'm still favoring a pick that sits just a bit off the flat side of my thumb.

I can't say I have a true winner as the variations are almost endless and the changes made to the character of my guitars is virtually limitless depending on the picks being used, the combinations I can come up with and my hand position.

Changing my hand position to better accommodate a thumb pick did improve my palm muting so there's the side benefit of the experimentation even if I go back to not wearing a thumb pick at all in the future.

I'm favoring a Delrin pick as the polycarbonates tend to make all of my guitars sound a bit more "plastic". The swap off here is the plastic picks are easier to shape around my thumb with the application of some heat. Now, that alone makes the idea of a two piece thumb pick somewhat appealing.



Fred Kelly picks were recommended by a member on the Stefan Grossman Woodshed forum so I ordered their variety pack; http://fredkellypicks.com/product/variety-bag/

Delivery was very prompt, from late Saturday night to Wednesday afternoon with no extra shipping charges applied. Actual delivery was faster, in fact, than their email confirming my order. Don't anticipate great communication from Kelly if you order direct from their webpage. The benefit though, other than the very quick delivery, is the ability to specify exactly which picks in which sizes and what gauges you would prefer in your individual package of picks. Calling might be the best option for ordering from Kelly, particularly since their web page is a bit of a PITA. Though when I called on Tuesday to confirm the order was placed, I got an answering system and no one returned my call. So just know Fred Kelly employs his family and they aren't all doing that much other than thinking up ideas for another pick.

But I'm sure you all know how this goes; you're sitting there in that same old duck suit you got for Valentine's Day years ago when it suddenly hits you that you haven't spent this day's allotment of cash on your guitars yet. So, there you are, at 3 AM, trying your best to get the **** web page to accept your ******* debit card number and "NO!" I do not ******* want to pay via ******* PayPal!!!

Anyway, ...

There's probably something for everyone to like in this pack o' picks. The flatpicks have a textured surface to increase their staying power in your hand. That's quite handy for those of us who hate to see that pick flying out of our hand and straight towards the dog. I've lost a lot of picks that way 'cause I just ain't gonna pick 'em out and use them again later on. The Speedpicks and the Slickpicks are what they claim; fast on the strings if you are switching between Travis style and single note lines.

The most interesting to me though is the Bumblebee thumbpick. Lots of versatility in the placement of the pick and the direction it exits away from your thumb make it a "great idea" IMO. The pick can be pushed forward towards the stings or back towards your thumb. In either position the pick can also be rotated to adjust how much of the pick's surface will strike the strings and at what angle. The degree of adjustment on the pick itself makes it slightly more versatile than the ProPik I had shown in the first response I had to this thread. Both picks (the Kelly's and the ProPik) are Delrin so the sonic difference is minor between the two and has more to do with the adjustments I can make to the Kelly pick. Fit is, for me at least, a bit snug with the medium sized picks on my IMO medium sized hands. That's not bad as they won't come flying off - yeah, the dog is PO'd - but they will likely get uncomfortable over a night of playing. So far I've yet to get the strap side adjusted to my liking but I'll keep experimenting to see whether I would be better off just ordering a larger size.

The other thumb pick I'm settling on is a now discontinued John Pearse, which did I mention? is now discontinued and awaiting a new production model from a new manufacturing machine. I've never really found a JP product I disliked so, when the new picks become available, I'll give his new design a shot; http://www.jpstrings.com/brpicks.htm

If you like the esoterica of picks, there's not much like the offerings at JP. No "revolutionary designs", just interesting products and lots of them IMO.


Now that I'm wearing a thumbpick, my fingers are feeling a bit left out in the volume department. While they could easily twist they now can't shout. And I still can't say whether fingerpicks are in my future or not. If they are, the choice would seem to be down to two models.

First would be Fred Kelly's Freedom Picks which attach with the extension beneath your finger to act more as a natural finger nail might when picking a string. I had a set from years back that I hadn't used much, rather favoring the sound and feel of just fingers. I'd say the Delrin Freedom picks are probably the best option for a finger picker who dislikes the sound of metal finger picks on steel (or, in my case, nickle) strings. The only issue is of fit, which is tight. Yep! the dog's still looking at me like I just shot her mother in front of her.

The pick provided in medium size in my specified variety pack is too small and probably not going to have enough adjustment for even my undoubtedly "medium" sized fingers. (No references to any politicians there, guys.) The old large sized Freedom Picks I had in my stash are a much better fit and Kelly claims the ability to make a pick as large as required should you decide to give them a try. The Delrin sound is somewhat rounded on the attack side and nicely "warm" with good sustain on the Martin Retro strings on any of my guitars. Not at all undesirable, quite likable in fact, but on the opposite side of the only other preferred finger picks I have at hand.

Mostly, I'm finding metal finger picks are scraping across the wound G string of my guitars. Any adjustment to the angle at which they strike the string makes then less stable on my fingers. The dog does like that.

The addition of the scrape preceding the note isn't at all what I'm looking for. The alternative I have at hand is the Ernie Ball metal finger pick with a teeny tiny end; https://www.elderly.com/accessories/...fingerpick.htm

The Pickey Pickey's give all of my guitars a somewhat light and airy sound with a lot of sustain to the melody notes. Even my cheapo Jim Dandy guitar sounds like it's all solid woods and five times is actual cost on the top three strings with the EB's on my fingers.

Of course, since the EB's sit on the flesh side of my finger, the frailers out there - we all know who they are - have already spotted a reason not to try the EB's. (Man! that guy's nails in the video are somewhere between frightening and OMG! I'm guessing he hasn't changed a spark plug in decades.)



That's where I'm at for now, the Kelly thumb picks are probably the choice though the JP I have is a close second and can probably be duplicated in a few other picks where the tip swings forward of the side strap. Possibly, the Zookies are the best choice there.

More work to do with the fingerpicks though the Kelly's are likely going to win simply due to their ability to play a string in either direction.

If any of you thought experimenting with strings was simple, give a few picks an audition to find out just how much you can alter the character of your guitar with an investment of as little as $0.90.
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Old 02-08-2018, 12:48 PM   #20
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I have some of the Kelly two-piece thumb picks and while I like them I can't use them to strum to save my soul, so I only use them for finger picking, and not always then. I have a couple old plastic thumb picks whose tips I altered last century some time to shorten them so I can keep my thumb closer to the strings and I can't give them up. I've grown more flexible about using thumb picks of various lengths, but those old "customized" plastic picks are still my favorite for feel. The Kelly you mention that adjust, however, is worth looking into!

Those JP picks look like they would be just too thick! I'd have to see them, I think.

I've seen the EB Picky picks but honestly thought I couldn't play with them. I'm so accustomed to playing with a rounded tip thumb pick the pointy tip might throw me into confusion.

Sorry to hear about that thumb nail, Jan!
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Old 02-08-2018, 04:52 PM   #21
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They told me I could grow out a new nail but I couldn't grow a new thumb.
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Old 02-09-2018, 08:48 AM   #22
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A friend of mine who plays autoharp uses thumb- and fingerpicks that are basically a short rubber finger cot with a "nail" attached. For some reason he wears them with the nail on the underside, like a conventional fingerpick, but worn the other way they would be like extended fingernails. I haven't tried them, so I don't know how they do for feel. I should see him Sunday; I'll try to remember to ask him the brand, etc.
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Old 02-09-2018, 09:22 AM   #23
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They told me I could grow out a new nail but I couldn't grow a new thumb.
Sounds like they might have gone to med school.
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Old 02-09-2018, 09:23 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by Cozmik Cowboy View Post
A friend of mine who plays autoharp uses thumb- and fingerpicks that are basically a short rubber finger cot with a "nail" attached. For some reason he wears them with the nail on the underside, like a conventional fingerpick, but worn the other way they would be like extended fingernails. I haven't tried them, so I don't know how they do for feel. I should see him Sunday; I'll try to remember to ask him the brand, etc.
I have NEVER seen such a thing. Look forward to the info!
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Old 02-09-2018, 11:06 AM   #25
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"Sounds like they might have gone to med school."



Most coitenly! I went to the "Dr. Howard, Dr. Fine, Dr. Howard Clinic, Plumbing Supplies and Kosher Deli"!

When I asked if they might have gone to any particular med school, they told me they might have.

Good enough for me!

Here's one of their promotional videos (they have a very hi-tech approach!);
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MaBxnMmMIkc


They believe in consultative diagnosis too; https://www.facebook.com/thethreesto...85/?fallback=1
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Old 02-09-2018, 05:12 PM   #26
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I just try not to dwell on the knowledge that 50% of all doctors finished in the bottom half of their class.

"What do you call someone who finished last in their med school class?"
"Doctor".
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Old 02-09-2018, 07:34 PM   #27
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Amazing! I'd known that about lawyers and preachers but not about docs.



I once worked with a guy who was very driven to be #1. He said it all came from the time he won 2nd place in a track and field meet while in high school. He showed his dad the ribbon they gave for coming in 2nd and his father told him "Second place is just being first among all the losers."

We all cringed.
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Old 02-11-2018, 12:51 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JanVigne View Post
"Sounds like they might have gone to med school."



Most coitenly! I went to the "Dr. Howard, Dr. Fine, Dr. Howard Clinic, Plumbing Supplies and Kosher Deli"!

When I asked if they might have gone to any particular med school, they told me they might have.

Good enough for me!

Here's one of their promotional videos (they have a very hi-tech approach!);
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MaBxnMmMIkc


They believe in consultative diagnosis too; https://www.facebook.com/thethreesto...85/?fallback=1
I thought it might be the Marx Bros but the Three Stooges works too.
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Old 04-15-2018, 10:27 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cozmik Cowboy View Post
A friend of mine who plays autoharp uses thumb- and fingerpicks that are basically a short rubber finger cot with a "nail" attached. For some reason he wears them with the nail on the underside, like a conventional fingerpick, but worn the other way they would be like extended fingernails. I haven't tried them, so I don't know how they do for feel. I should see him Sunday; I'll try to remember to ask him the brand, etc.
Sorry I took so long with this; here they are:

https://crossroadsmusiccompany.com/product/tufp/
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Old 04-16-2018, 08:59 AM   #30
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They look like wearing a jacket in July. I don't know, can your fingertips sweat?
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