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Old 08-16-2015, 09:13 AM   #1
Fredrik.from.norway
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Default Identify old guitar

Hey!

I need some help identifying an old guitar. It sounds really good, and plays well to. It would be fun if anybody knows something about this guitar.


Best Regards,

Fredrik
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Old 08-16-2015, 07:14 PM   #2
mcquinnsr
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I would guess Framus. But haven't been able to prove it to myself yet http://www.framus-vintage.de/modules/site/site.php http://www.ebay.com/itm/331559889379
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Old 08-17-2015, 10:57 AM   #3
JanVigne
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My "guess", though you won't want to hear it, is it doesn't matter.

No "major" manufacturer builds an instrument without identifying that instrument as their product. Most often, the manufacturer's name will be on the headstock. At the very least, some label somewhere on or in the instrument will say this guitar was built by "X".

If an instrument completely lacks any identifying marks, then it's a reasonably safe bet it wasn't built in a factory or as a single build to order luthier product. That's not a universal truth but one that stands up fairly well in most cases.

There's no logical reason a player would remove all identification from their guitar. It would seriously impact the value of their instrument. Basically, it would be throwing money away to do so.

It's possible your guitar was built by an individual as a kit or as a project. Larger cities have shops and schools which teach you how to build your own guitar - or bass or mandolin or whatever you want. It's possible your guitar came out of such a project. If so, materials used are reliant on the budget of the builder and quality of construction is based on the skills of the individual along with the tools at their disposal.

If your guitar plays well and sounds good to your ear, then enjoy your guitar.

Most of us like what we own, until we don't.

Taken out of the context of other instruments, your guitar may be as sweet as pie. When sitting side by side with a major manufacturers product, it may show its pedigree.

Either way, it's yours and you should make the most of what it has to offer.
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Old 08-17-2015, 06:59 PM   #4
Fredrik.from.norway
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Hello!

Thank you for your answers, mcquinnsr and JanVigne . It doesn't really matter how much its worth, unless its 1 million dollars, of course. I'm just curious.

What I like about the guitar is that it sounds like it looks, old and drunk (english is not my first language, as you may notice). It's the absolute opposite of my Waterloo guitar (my favorite guitar these days), witch is kind of interesting.

Its fun to play a guitar, that sounds like its ready to fall apart, but still has a rich sound. And I love the low frequencies in the higher notes (don't get me started on the low strings, wow!). And when I think about the interesting past this guitar may have had, it can easily sit side by side with all the major manufacturers in the world.

This was not meant to be as aggressive as it may seem (In lack of a better word).
Your answer was really helpful, JanVigne.

Have a nice evening
Fredrik
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Old 08-18-2015, 09:55 AM   #5
JanVigne
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I often refer to vintage (and even just plain old) guitars that are tremendous fun to play as already knowing a lot of great songs even before I got there.

In "English" we tend to describe "old and drunk" and "vintage and funky". It's a very interesting sound, no doubt.

You don't say what styles of music you play but many of our best known "funky vintage" guitars are perfect for the acoustic blues sound that came out of the SouthEastern (Apalachian/Piedmont) US mountain regions and the Mississippi Delta region which fed the Great Migration Northward to Chicago as mechanization pushed workers off the plantations and they followed the highways to multiple points along the great muddy Mississippi River.

Think Robert Johnson, Charley Patton and such along with Muddy Waters, Howlin'Wolf (before they left the plantation) and even the Memphis based Beale street influenced sound of very early Elvis and Scotty Moore. Visitors to Sun Studios claim to feel the vibe of these artists when walking into the recording studio that Sam Phillips created. Before Elvis, Phillips was recording many of the regional blues and R&B artists then sending the recordings North to sell in Kansas City, St. Louis and Chicago as "race records".

(Memphis was busy this last week with the 38th anniversary of Elvis' death and approximately 35,000 visitors to Graceland for the annual tribute to a sound.)

Have you tried a slide with this guitar? That's typically a very unique sound when combined with a guitar that sounds as if it's about to fall apart.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dmfw7O2b5r4
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Old 08-18-2015, 05:43 PM   #6
mcquinnsr
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think I found it Framus Vintage although the neck seems to be off of the Rosita series which has different f holes. I would bet money it is a mid 50's Framus though.
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